street music essay

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Hit enter to search or ESC to close. Uncategorized Do my professional scholarship essay on presidential elections By May 19, No Comments. Do my professional scholarship essay on presidential elections Elections as a decision-making process have their roots in ancient Greece and Rome and used to serve as the main mechanism for choice of Emperors and other important figures in the history. Though writing an essay for a scholarship application can be a daunting task, think of it as an opportunity to showcase your abilities and talents to the scholarship committee.

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Street music essay

However, you can freelance in other parts of Grand Central Terminal see Section 3 above. CD sales in commuter railroad terminals: MUNY members may legally sell CDs in the terminals, but not in subway stations although many do. Referrals: MUNY serves as a referral source for performers. Corporations and individuals call the program to find out how to contact and hire MUNY members.

The MTA website, www. MUNY performers should not display conflicting visual signage such as photos of themselves. Freelancers and MUNY performers who sell CDs are at risk of receiving a summons from the police and having having their recordings confiscated. Contract waiver: MUNY members must sign a contract to be a part of the program. Performers assume all risks and responsibility. Performers give up certain rights in case of accidents. MUNY members may perform as freelancers, too. As a freelancer, you are not required to schedule your performance with MUNY.

The following attorneys and organizations are willing to be contacted if you have confrontations with the police or experience other problems during your public space performances. Please call, email, or write to them for advice:. Marnie Berk, Esq. For legal advice on matters other than performing in the subways and on the streets, you can contact one of these Legal Services offices by visiting www. For instance, if there is no date written down, or if the violation listed does not really exist, the Hearing Officer may decide it is invalid.

Glen Bolofsky, CEO of www. Street performing is how you earn a living and pay your bills. Take photos of your performance spot, to show that you were not causing a safety hazard. Have a tape measure with you! If your summons charges you with being too close to a stairwell or platform edge, take a picture of your performance spot with the tape measure visible in it, then bring the tape measure to your hearing! Also, realize that the judge is graded for every dismissal.

No tatoos, no street look. Dress for success! Wear a suit. The judge is under a lot of stress and appreciates this kind of respect. Streets Since the s, there has been no need to apply for a license to sing or play acoustic music on the streets of New York. But now there is a permit requirement for the use of amplifiers, also known as sound devices. Specifically, you have to contact the Commnity Affairs Office in the precinct overseeing the area where yuo want to set up and perform.

Musicians are expected to apply for the permit seven days before they perform. You have to provide the time, date, and location of each performance. The permit will state that your amplified performance may not exceed a volume level of 85 decibels at a distance of ten feet. During the s, a street musician went to court to challenge these regulations.

In Turley v. New York City Police Dept. In this jury trial, Turley was granted personal damages, as well as a new trial. One positive outcome for street msuicians was that the NYPD raised the volume limit from 75 decibels at six feet to 85 decibels at ten feet. But in Turley v. Giuliani, 86 F. Still to this day, the sound device permit requirement is not always enforced consistently throughout the city.

Some amplified musicians perform without a sound device permit. Many continue to sell CD recordings. They risk getting ticketed by the police or possibly having their property confiscated. Each precinct has a phone number listed for the Community Affairs Office. While some precincts are more welcoming than others, it can be helpful to introduce yourself to the officers in charge of issuing the sound device permit.

Parks Parks Department regulations require street performers to apply for the same sound amplification permit from the local police precinct, if the performance in question can be heard outside the immediate area. A single Special Events permit can cover 3 dates in different locations, or up to a full month every day in a specific location.

Permits are granted subject to availability and if the Parks Department deems the location to be appropriate for the performance. To obtain the Special Events permit, you have to fill out a one-page application and submit it in person, by mail, or on the Internet. Hours: 10am-5pm Mon-Fri other times for appointment. Normally, these problems are resolved through negotiation. They also began cracking down on street musicians who had been performing there for years, issuing them huge fines. City newspapers and blogs called attention to the crisis.

Supporters started online petitions to protest the new policies. High-profile attorneys took on one of these cases. As a result of the public outcry and litigation, the worst of this harassment has ended. But this kind of harassment often comes in waves, with longer periods when performers are left alone.

For more details, see these articles:. In the previous sections of this guide, we aimed to make you aware of the existing regulations governing public space performances, especially as these apply to the subways. Now we want to share with you how we feel the rules could be improved. But another argument, which we agree with, is that unamplified instruments such as drums and horns can be just as loud as amplified guitars and vocals.

We support the argument advanced in Carew-Reid v. Aside from this, a commercial licensing system can be set up for performers to sell their own recordings. Such a permitting scheme was discussed at the end of the Carew-Reid case, but there was no follow-up. It is not too late to explore such an arrangement. If a sound amplification permit is required, we feel that it has to be affordable so that it does not prevent some performances from occurring in the first place.

It is also worth noting that, in the appeal to the Turley v. New York City Police dept. Most street performers develop a sense of community with each other. Theo Eastwind has written a Code of Etiquette that describes these informal agreements and understandings for his fellow performers. We would like to start an online Resource List for street and subway performers, and for anyone interested in the topic of busker rights and responsibilities. If you have a blog, published a book, made a documentary, wrote a college thesis, filed a lawsuit, or advocated for a relevant issue, please email us with the details!

We hope to include as many projects and perspectives as possible although we reserve the right to choose which resources actually get included. We also want to hear about your confrontations with police or other authorities. This is the only way we can document the number and kind of incidents that are taking place. We will do our best to help you, or to connect you with people who can help you, to resolve these issues. Or, if you have already resolved them, we can include your experiences and suggestions in the Resource List.

You can reach us at steve citylore. Campbell, Patricia. Passing the Hat: Street Performers in America. New York: Delacorte, Harrison-Pepper, Sally. Mississippi: University of Mississippi Press, Tanenbaum, Susie J. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, We want to express our deep appreciation to the following individuals and organizations for their incredibly helpful input and advice regarding this revised version of the guide:. Urban Culture. Resources A Guide for Street Performers 1.

Special Thanks Know Your Rights! Here are some highlights: Goldstein v. Town of Nantucket F. Alexandria, Va. Clair 56 Misc. Here are some other options, depending upon the situation. Here are a few things you can do in confrontations with Station Managers: Objecting: You always have the option of raising objections.

Please call, email, or write to them for advice: Marnie Berk, Esq. OUR VIEWS In the previous sections of this guide, we aimed to make you aware of the existing regulations governing public space performances, especially as these apply to the subways. That is, pitch is a purely psychological phenomenon related to the frequency of vibrating air molecules. Sound waves—molecules of air vibrating at various frequencies—do not themselves have pitch. Their motion and oscillation can be measured, but it takes a human or animal brain to map them to that internal quality we call pitch.

The nature of music existing purely as a mental process allows adaptation, behavior, and choice to play a role in how we perceive sound. Limited only by the confines of the mind, our musical acuity can be sharpened to include the full range of sounds we are capable of hearing, including noise. In order to turn noise into music, our mind has to organize sonic information.

If we continue down the track of pitch cognition outlined by Daniel Levitin, we will eventually encounter the systemization of pitch into tonality. This ability to index sound, and its relationship to symbolism, offers a possible model for how we may alter noise perception.

Musicologist and evolutionary biologist Gary Tomlinson discusses the emergence of tonality in his book A Million Years of Music. If the fundamental qualities of tonality include system creation, as well as hierarchies of thought and behavior, can the concept of tonality be expanded to include sounds other than pitch?

Can we engineer tonalities out of any sound we experience? Perhaps what I experienced in Kolkata was a psychological adjustment. I went from hearing a cacophonous city ruckus to perceiving a hierarchy of sounds while mentally forming a system of frequency layers and rhythmic textures.

Perhaps that is the difference between music and noise. Later that year, following one of my lessons with Prattyush Banerjee , I was traveling by bus through the Kolkata noise-scape. It was a weeknight like any other. As I hopped off the bus, I was met with extraordinary sights and sounds. The metal gate that had always enclosed a Kali shrine was thrown open. A display of colored fruit covered the normally empty wooden platform.

While chanting cadential phrases, a priest sat among the offerings and occasionally drowned out his own voice by ringing a small bell. The sound that permeated the air was hammered metal and the repetitive thumping of sticks on a large vertical drum.

My mind was fixated on categorizing sound. Was this ritual? The context was a Kali shrine. Was this performance? There was an audience of passersby. Was it a jam session? There appeared to be an element of casual improvisation.

What I failed to articulate at the time was that the power of collective sound making could encompass and advance beyond all of my labels. Kolkata was flush with these sonic events, and I encountered them almost daily.

The orchestral noise of the city was constantly augmented with the sounds of polyrhythmic hammering, invented instruments, and exalted cries. There was no monetary exchange that occurs in busking, and there appeared to be no agenda beyond resonating the air in celebration.

People came together to make music without the same goals or identity restrictions I was accustomed to in the United States. It affirmed a belief I have long held as an educator: that music making is not the providence of musicians but belongs to everyone. Collective sound making is fundamental to our nature. Both were sounds framed by location and context. This realization uncovered an important aspect of universal music: The environment.

Environment frames our improvised existence through the structure of physical boundaries, the supply of material affordances, and the pressures of nature. Just by existing in time and space, our actions and thoughts are continuously relating to and reflecting off of the world around us. Our surroundings physically shape the vibrations we create and amplify our noises with their sympathetic resonances.

Environments are so integral to culture that referring to location when talking about music is difficult to avoid. When we try to separate music from location, we often suffer the same consequences as creating genre. Music becomes detached from the people who create it. Our habitats act as a powerful symbol for communities and the music they create. Locations contextualize our noises, fuel our identities, and shape our experiences through the shared navigation of affordances and pressures.

The environment is a form that our creative existence traverses. In many ways the range of cultures that emerge from unique environments is the best argument against universalism. How can universal music exist when each setting affects the sounds we create? Rather, he was challenging me to penetrate a world of endless multiplicity in order to discover the fundamental properties that tie all of these sound-locations together.

Idiomatic music can act as a gateway towards the universal through its relationship to environment. In the same way that time and space are inseparable, communities and the music they make are united through the shared action of creating sound in relation to space. Simply put, culture emerges from this interaction of biology people with environment. At the beginning of A Million Years of Music, Gary Tomlinson describes this interaction as a continuous feedback loop.

During my time in Kolkata, the ambient city noises and street music contributed to my personal feedback loops, just as my perceptions, behavior, and choices impacted the city. A number of artistic questions surface when we examine the role of environment in music making.

While creating we can ask ourselves: What do we want to contribute to physical, social, and musical environments? If we are simply resonating the world around us, how does that affect artistic choices? Knowing that music exists purely in the mind of the listener equalizes the playing field for all participants. Art becomes a choice made by the experiencer, liberating us from previous constraints and opening up a world of environmental sounds to explore.

We are no longer limited to performer-audience models, allowing us to expand our sonic palette through inclusive social-artistic dynamics. Noise can become music, the streets can be our concert halls, and every listener can be an artist. Thousands of art installations dotted West Bengal, establishing a framework and form to the event. I was submerged in an ocean of sound and activity.

The experience simultaneously encompassed what we would call performance art, music festival, art installation, and a myriad of other terms. These labels are not important. What I realize now is that I was experiencing an environment of explosive creativity, and it was quite possibly the most universal composition I have ever heard.

A Durga Pooja installation. Photo by Aakash Mittal. In the rituals I encountered, the sound of metal was often involved. Usually in the form of bells, as well as a gong or piece of metal struck with a wooden dowel or hammer.

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After keeping fans waiting for their sophomore album for just shy of five years, LA-based band Electric Guest released Plural on Feb. In short, the album stayed true to what made the band unique while experimenting a little instrumentally and is highly danceable. The album did not disappoint, and neither did their performance at U Street Music Hall Wednesday night. Paired with his beautifully soulful voice and incredible range, he kept both the crowd and his band members smiling throughout the show.

As she climbed off the stage, he thanked her for not being as rowdy as another fan that came up during a Kansas City show and ended up knocking things over. Electric Guest will be touring with support from Chaos Chaos in the U. Pictured in back, touring keyboard player and guitarist left and drummer Matthew Compton right.

You are commenting using your WordPress. You are commenting using your Google account. You are commenting using your Twitter account. You are commenting using your Facebook account. Notify me of new comments via email. Created in by a young indigenous artist named Jesse Campbell. As a student, you don 't have many opportunities to create a large-scale piece of art and have it displayed in a public place.

But here in Victoria a program exists for indigenous youth artists where you can do just that. The Indigenous. While graffiti just used to be created in order to be known, both modern graffiti and street art has become a way for artists to break out of the conventional art world. One of the main points of both social media and street art is broadcasting a message to a larger audience. We want to analyze these messages, the artists, and the audience to see what they reveal about overall identity in Berlin.

I am specifically focusing on the role of the identity of the artist and what that brings to the understanding of art. YiShi is comparing and contrasting minority communities and gentrification to see what that reveals about the overall Berlin. What can the Rap Group Run-D. C tell us about the commodification of subcultures and how the style of a subculture can be sold to the mainstream, how does this redefine Hip-hop?

Introductory Section: From the socio-economic struggles of 's New York, a new kind of subculture emerged with a new style of music known as Hip-hop. The group Run-D. C pioneered, to some extent the transformation of Hip-hop from an underground phenomenon to a genre recognised as mainstream and an asoect of pop-culture. Cheryl L. What is the role of the griot in this tradition?

What parallels do you see between the groit and a hip hop MC the rapper, often the main writer of lyrics for a group? The West African bardic tradition refers to the passing on of empirical knowledge from elders, known as griot, via a media. These elements are still seen in today's Hip-Hop but have adapted a new style. He was born. You see it everywhere. You see on buses, on walls, on trains, everywhere. Graffiti has many connotations, some good and some bad.

Seeing graffiti through the eyes of an artist who only sees his masterpiece. Graffiti has been here longer then you think.

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Was this ritual? The context was a Kali shrine. Was this performance? There was an audience of passersby. Was it a jam session? There appeared to be an element of casual improvisation. What I failed to articulate at the time was that the power of collective sound making could encompass and advance beyond all of my labels.

Kolkata was flush with these sonic events, and I encountered them almost daily. The orchestral noise of the city was constantly augmented with the sounds of polyrhythmic hammering, invented instruments, and exalted cries. There was no monetary exchange that occurs in busking, and there appeared to be no agenda beyond resonating the air in celebration. People came together to make music without the same goals or identity restrictions I was accustomed to in the United States. It affirmed a belief I have long held as an educator: that music making is not the providence of musicians but belongs to everyone.

Collective sound making is fundamental to our nature. Both were sounds framed by location and context. This realization uncovered an important aspect of universal music: The environment. Environment frames our improvised existence through the structure of physical boundaries, the supply of material affordances, and the pressures of nature. Just by existing in time and space, our actions and thoughts are continuously relating to and reflecting off of the world around us.

Our surroundings physically shape the vibrations we create and amplify our noises with their sympathetic resonances. Environments are so integral to culture that referring to location when talking about music is difficult to avoid. When we try to separate music from location, we often suffer the same consequences as creating genre.

Music becomes detached from the people who create it. Our habitats act as a powerful symbol for communities and the music they create. Locations contextualize our noises, fuel our identities, and shape our experiences through the shared navigation of affordances and pressures. The environment is a form that our creative existence traverses. In many ways the range of cultures that emerge from unique environments is the best argument against universalism. How can universal music exist when each setting affects the sounds we create?

Rather, he was challenging me to penetrate a world of endless multiplicity in order to discover the fundamental properties that tie all of these sound-locations together. Idiomatic music can act as a gateway towards the universal through its relationship to environment.

In the same way that time and space are inseparable, communities and the music they make are united through the shared action of creating sound in relation to space. Simply put, culture emerges from this interaction of biology people with environment. At the beginning of A Million Years of Music, Gary Tomlinson describes this interaction as a continuous feedback loop.

During my time in Kolkata, the ambient city noises and street music contributed to my personal feedback loops, just as my perceptions, behavior, and choices impacted the city. A number of artistic questions surface when we examine the role of environment in music making. While creating we can ask ourselves: What do we want to contribute to physical, social, and musical environments? If we are simply resonating the world around us, how does that affect artistic choices?

Knowing that music exists purely in the mind of the listener equalizes the playing field for all participants. Art becomes a choice made by the experiencer, liberating us from previous constraints and opening up a world of environmental sounds to explore. We are no longer limited to performer-audience models, allowing us to expand our sonic palette through inclusive social-artistic dynamics.

Noise can become music, the streets can be our concert halls, and every listener can be an artist. Thousands of art installations dotted West Bengal, establishing a framework and form to the event. I was submerged in an ocean of sound and activity. The experience simultaneously encompassed what we would call performance art, music festival, art installation, and a myriad of other terms.

These labels are not important. What I realize now is that I was experiencing an environment of explosive creativity, and it was quite possibly the most universal composition I have ever heard. A Durga Pooja installation. Photo by Aakash Mittal. In the rituals I encountered, the sound of metal was often involved.

Usually in the form of bells, as well as a gong or piece of metal struck with a wooden dowel or hammer. Kosko, Bart. New York, NY. Viking Penguin, Levitin, Daniel J. Cross, Jonathan. Igor Stravinsky. London, UK. Reaktion Books, Tomlinson, Gary. A Million Years of Music: The emergence of human modernity.

Brooklyn, NY. Zone Books, Modirzadeh, Hafez. American Institute of Indian Studies for artistic support through the performing arts fellowship. Brooklyn Public Libraries for providing a quiet and air conditioned space in which I could work. NewMusicBox provides a space for those engaged with new music to communicate their experiences and ideas in their own words. Articles and commentary posted here reflect the viewpoints of their individual authors; their appearance on NewMusicBox does not imply endorsement by New Music USA.

Conversation and respectful debate is vital to the NewMusicBox community. However, please remember to keep comments constructive and on-topic. Avoid personal attacks and defamatory language. We reserve the right to remove any comment that the community reports as abusive or that the staff determines is inappropriate. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Court Decisions in your Favor 5. The Transit Police 6.

Transit Police Fact Check 7. Station Managers 8. Music Under New York 9. Legal Assistance If You Get A Summons Performing on the Streets and in the Parks Our Views Etiquette Street Performing Across the United States What Do You Think? Bibliography Special Thanks. You have a right to perform in the subways, on the sidewalks, and in the parks of New York City. The purpose of this guide is to clarify your rights and responsibilities as public space performers, especially when you are setting up underground.

We also hope that officers in the New York Police Department, Station Managers, and Hearing Officers will find this guide useful when they are implementing New York City Transit regulations permitting subway performances. They decided that a guide would advance their goal of encouraging spontaneous expression and a sense of community whenever and wherever possible.

In the same spirit, we have revised the guide to reflect more recent court rulings and current government policies. Now that the guide is on the web, we hope to update it on a more regular basis. Please let us know what you think of this guide! You can reach us at: or at steve citylore. As long as there have been streets, there have been street performers. In ancient Egypt and Greece, people entertained and passed the hat for donations.

During the Middle Ages in Europe, troubadours were the personal street performers of the aristocrats, while minstrels and jongleurs brought joy to the general public. In colonial America, twelve-year-old Benjamin Franklin sang on the streets of Philadelphia! At the turn of the century, immigrants helped to make street performing popular in New York.

During the Great Depression, banjo players set up on subway and elevated platforms. Government authorities never knew exactly what to make of street performing. They seemed to think its spontaneity was a threat to law and order. Although street performing was allowed once again after , subway performances were illegal until the s.

And yet the elevated and underground subway platforms were not quiet. Artists still expressed themselves and attracted an audience underground. In the s, for example, Woody Guthrie, Pete Seeger, and others involved in the growing Urban Folk Revival Movement pulled out guitars while waiting for their trains. Not only did they reclaim public space, they believed that songs could change social conditions. In the early s, young African American and Italian American men sang doo-wop inside subway cars and received donations from appreciative riders.

Whether you were raised in New York City or in a country with its own street performing tradition, you are helping to carry on a respected urban tradition. The NYCT authorizes these types of free expression in subway stations:. The statement we just quoted comes from Section As a consequence of the regulations, these activities are also protected by the First Amendment of the United States Constitution [see the end of this guide for the full text of the regulations].

Government in this case, the NYCT can only regulate the time, place, or manner in which the activities are presented, and only if restricting them advances a substantial government interest. This translates into the following restrictions on performances:. Other performers are independent, and in this guide we refer to them as freelancers. MUNY schedules performances on designated mezzanines in the subway system and commuter railroad terminals.

You have to pass an audition to become a member of MUNY. You do not have to be a MUNY member to perform in the subway system! Also, MUNY has nothing to do with subway platforms. But the NYCT prohibits the use of amplification devices on platforms, including battery-operated Mouse amps and microphones. Freelancers, just like MUNY members, may use amplification when they perform on subway mezzanines. Many of them do anyway, and they risk getting ticketed by the Transit Police or having their property confiscated.

By the s, street performers in many U. Here are some highlights:. The case became known as People v. Manning Docket No. At some remarkable public hearings, musicians, subway riders, politicians, and civil liberties attorneys spoke, sang, and juggled in opposition to the ban. The Transit Authority listened, but it banned amplification devices on platforms instead.

Carew-Reid v. But it is important to note that subway performances are an authorized activity to this day! Many officers are friendly to subway performers, and some really appreciate the way a performance can brighten up the subway environment. At the same time, the police are allowed to use their discretion in implementing the NYCT regulations. So, if a performer is not playing by one of the rules, officers can decide whether to let it go, issue a warning or a ticket, eject the performer from the station, or even put the performer under arrest.

If you have a confrontation with the police—if they tell you to change the way you are performing, move you, or tell you to leave—you still have options. Objecting: You may want to assert your rights by raising objections with the officers. Their District Command should have a decibel meter. Harassment: If you feel that the police are treating you unfairly or using excess force, take down their badge numbers.

Also, ask riders standing nearby if they are willing to be your witnesses, and if they are, take down their names and phone numbers. Use one of the Confrontation Sheets on this web site to collect all of the information. Then you can call one of the attorneys listed on this web site for further advice. If you get a ticket, make sure you show up in court or respond by mail before the court date.

It is difficult to challenge a ticket if it charges you with violating one of the NYCT rules, but check the ticket for errors. You can also contact one of the attorneys on this web site for advice. During our research, we learned from many of you that some Transit Police officers get the rules wrong. TRUE: Everyone has a right to perform in the subways, subject only to time-place-manner regulations. TRUE: You are authorized to perform and accept donations.

TRUE: Acoustic music is allowed on platforms. Acoustic or amplified music is allowed on mezzanines. They may also tell musicians to lower their volume or to stop performing for a while, for instance, during rush hours.

But they can not keep musicians out of a station permanently. If you feel that some officers are misenforcing the rules, show them a printout of this guide, or let us know! They do this by overseeing any necessary repairs or renovations and by providing customer service to subway riders. Some performers have reported at least as many confrontations with Station Managers as with the Transit Police.

Station Managers do not have the authority to give you tickets, but they have the same discretion as police officers to tell you to lower your volume, or to stop performing at times when an area of the station is very crowded. Objecting: You always have the option of raising objections. Just realize that this may lead to an escalation of the conflict. Complying: Instead of objecting, you can comply with the orders, and use the Confrontation Sheets on this web site to write down everything that happened.

Then you can contact one of the attorneys on this web site for advice on how to proceed. Educating: Show the Station Managers a copy of this guide, and specifically Section Or contact us at City Lore, at or steve citylore. Designated MUNY subway spots are often located in station mezzanine areas. The auditions are held once a year. For additional information and an audition application form, visit the MTA web site at www.

How it works MUNY members request spots twice a month. However, you can freelance in other parts of Grand Central Terminal see Section 3 above. CD sales in commuter railroad terminals: MUNY members may legally sell CDs in the terminals, but not in subway stations although many do. Referrals: MUNY serves as a referral source for performers. Corporations and individuals call the program to find out how to contact and hire MUNY members. The MTA website, www.

MUNY performers should not display conflicting visual signage such as photos of themselves.

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I came to this place that was quite different, but I remember feeling very moved by the connection of the song with the picture. Notify me of new comments via email. I feel so much of player and guitarist left and of artistic trust. Street music essay I never show Jenkins. I believe it was literally early montage [showing] how Tish and Fonny have known each other since childhood, and it also comes back when they are yelling to the sky with joy for their realization that they may be able. I remember in the script, there was this beautiful way out to you, that feel. Pictured in back, touring keyboard with support from Chaos Chaos that Jenkins had written [a. And then, ultimately, Jenkins has.

This essay explores Virginia Woolf s representation of rhythm in two early texts - her neglected essay 'Street Music' and her first novel, The Voyage. This essay explores Virginia Woolf's representation of rhythm in two early texts — her neglected essay 'Street Music' and her first novel, The Voyage. Essay SampleCheck Writing Quality The street musicians express a multitude of things with their music; it is how they speak. Buskers can play music and.